Noticias Científicas

<p>Tissue sample from healthy human liver (IRBBarcelona/IDIBAPS)</p>
11 Dec 2015

A study by IRB Barcelona and IDIBAPS reveals a therapeutic target to prevent the development of the many abnormal blood vessels that cause gastrointestinal bleeding—the main complication in cirrhosis.

Cirrhosis is the main risk factor for liver cancer. The same target may be the key to preventing and treating this condition.

Cirrhosis figures among the top twenty causes of death from disease worldwide.

10 Dec 2015

A comment by Cayetano González in Nature News & Views

<p>Plasmid DNA simulation (P Dans. IRB Barcelona)</p>
17 Nov 2015

The simulation method developed in Modesto Orozco’s laboratory allows the study—with unprecedented accuracy—of structural changes in DNA and of the interaction of DNA with proteins and drugs.

All the simulations and posterior analyses are kept in the first online tool developed to date dedicated to atomic level simulations of nucleic acids.

The platform is free of charge and available to the entire scientific community through the Spanish Institute of Bioinformatics and the European network ELIXIR-Excellerate.

In addition to other uses, the new method provides greater insight into how DNA is recognised by proteins that modify its function or by the drugs that bind to it to exert their therapeutic action, thereby furthering our understanding of the biological function of DNA.

<p>Globular shape that initial aggregates of amyloid beta protein adopt (Image: A. Arcella, IRB Barcelona)</p>
14 Oct 2015

Natàlia Carulla’s research group provides information that questions the widely accepted premise regarding the number of molecules and the shape of the first aggregates formed by amyloid beta protein

Amyloid beta protein aggregation, the process by which molecules of this protein adhere to each other is strongly associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease

Carulla’s work ultimately seeks to identify molecules that interfere with the initial stages of aggregation as a strategy to combat the disease.

<p>Picture showing the metastasis of a primary breast tumour to bone (Author: Formas Naturales by Inbiomotion)</p>
16 Sep 2015

A study published today in the Journal of National Cancer Institute (JNCI) by ICREA researcher Roger Gomis may be key to the early detection of patients at risk of developing metastasis to the bone

This new knowledge may accelerate the development of the first preventive treatment of bone metastasis

Inbiomotion, an IRB Barcelona spin off company and financed with venture investors Ysios Capital, has already begun clinical trials

15 Sep 2015

Scientists at IRB Barcelona publish the details of an old tissue transplant method for Drosophila melanogaster.

This technique allows the study of tumour growth and tissue regeneration

<p>Inntags is a new tool for protein tagging (Image: Dr Aldea's laboratory)</p>
1 Sep 2015

A study conducted in collaboration with the CSIC, BSC and UB provides a new approach to follow cellular proteins more closely.

The target proteins labelled with inntags do not show detectable alterations of function or localization.

<p>Depletion of the PTEN tumour suppressor gene induces tissue overgrowth and reduces the growth of the neighbouring cell population in Drosophila wing primordia (Image: Marco Milán’s Lab).</p>
28 Aug 2015

Researchers at IRB Barcelona unravel a role for tumour suppressor genes in restricting the growth of neighbouring cell populations.

The study, published yesterday in PLoS Biology, might have implications for understanding the early events of tumorigenesis and the selection of the tumour-initiating cells.

<p>The bristle is a mechano-sensory organ that houses the cilium projected by a neuron.  Two structures found at the base of each cilium, centriole, and transition zone, can be seen in green and red, respectively (Gonzalez Lab)</p>
21 Aug 2015

The study, published in Current Biology, focuses on cilia, the cellular structures that by sensing chemicals and mechanical forces allow for smelling, hearing, and many other essential functions. 

<p>In a developing Drosophila embryo, (above) E-Cadherin keep cells together to facilitate coordinated migration; (below) without E-Cad cells are disorganised. (J Casanova lab)</p>
14 Aug 2015

Researchers at IRB Barcelona reveal that the protein E-Cadherin is required for groups of diverse cells to migrate together

Tumours with intermediary levels of E-Cadherin generally have a poorer prognosis; the phenomenon of heterogeneous cell migration may be related to this