Noticias Científicas

22 Jul 2015

A study, published today in the journal Nature, marks a milestone in the understanding of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)

CLL is the most frequent leukemia with more than 12,000 new cases diagnosed in Europe every year

IRB Barcelona group leader Modesto Orozco participated in the study as he is involved with the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC)

<p>Structural details of the MH2 domains of Smad2 and 4 , with mutations, shown in orange, found in lung tumours.</p>
13 Jul 2015

Maria Macias, Pau Martín, and Joan Massagué publish a featured review article in Trends in Biochemical Sciences (TIBS) on the Smad protein family, the members of which play a key role in cancer.

The article is accompanied by a web application in which available 3D structures of Smads can be explored, as can their alterations in several metazoa, their variability in humans, and their mutations in tumours.

<p>CEP63 depletion increases stem cell death in the developing mouse brain. The image on the right shows the stem dying cells in purple. The mice are born with microcephaly, a characteristic feature of Seckel Syndrome (Image: Berta Terré, IRB Barcelona)</p>
7 Jul 2015

Researchers at IRB Barcelona study CEP63, a gene that is mutated in Seckel Syndrome, a rare disease that causes microcephaly and growth defects.

The protein CEP63 is crucial for the correct division of brain stem cells. In its absence, mice reproduce Seckel Syndrome.

The scientists rescued the microcephaly during mouse embryonic development by removing a protein that caused the loss of stem cells.

Also, CEP63-depleted male mice are infertile. The relationship between this protein and sperm production is revealed for the first time.

<p>Swiss researcher Roman Kessler is co-author of the study published today in Nature Communications (Photo:Battista/Minocri, IRB Barcelona)</p>
28 Apr 2015

A study done on fruit flies and published in Nature Communications reveals that the protein dDsk2, in addition to degrading proteins, also plays a key role in regulating gene expression.

This protein is also present in humans and is known to be mutated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s. But the mechanism by which these mutations contribute to the development of disease remains unclear.

IRB Barcelona is to start a study to examine the relationship between dDsk2 mutations and neurodegenerative diseases.

<p>Protein network for Alzheimer's disease (source: dSysMap, IRB Barcelona)</p>
27 Feb 2015

dSysMap (which stands for “Disease-mutations Systemic Mapping”) is a computational tool to interpret the effect of genetic mutations on the development of complex diseases.

The tool allows researchers to explore how alterations in more than 2,000 proteins affect the diverse biological functions in which these molecules are involved.

The Pan-Cancer consortium has included the tool in order to gain a more global view of the causes of tumour development.

<p>Patient-derived tumour organoids (mini colon tumours). In blue: cellular nuclei; in red: cellular membranes (Image: Enza Lonardo, IRB Barcelona)</p>
23 Feb 2015

A study published in Nature Genetics by researchers at IRB Barcelona explains the basis for the classification of colon tumours in good or bad prognosis by analysing the tissue surrounding the tumour cells.

The scientists are currently developing a test that enables the identification of patients at risk of relapse after surgical removal of the tumour by measuring 4-6 genes expressed by the tumour microenvironment.

The researchers also propose to test in patients a particular drug that blocks the metastatic capacity of colorectal cancers in mice.

This drug has been tested using novel technology that allows the growth of mini colon cancers, also known as organoids, derived from patient samples.

<p>Detail of one mm of a mouse brain. In green, capillaries that form part of the blood-brain barrier; in red, molecules attached to the shuttle patented by IRB Barcelona have managed to cross the barrier and reach the brain (black backgr). (Benjamí Oller)</p>
5 Feb 2015

Chemists at IRB Barcelona patent and present a shuttle capable of transporting molecules into the brain; this achievement could facilitate the treatment of diseases with no therapy available.

98% of drugs targeting the central nervous system are discarded because they are unable to cross the physical barrier that protects the brain.

The IRB Barcelona scientists, together with clinical teams, are now evaluating the potential of their shuttle for rare and orphan diseases.

<p>Scheme of photoswitchable inhibition protein-protein interaction (PPI). / Pau Gorostiza et al.</p>
23 Jan 2015

Researchers in Barcelona discover more potential candidates on the route to tailored, photo-switchable therapies by disproving design limitation

<p>Analogs of borrelidin to treat malaria (IRB Barcelona)</p>
10 Dec 2014

Researchers at IRB Barcelona identify a family of efficient and selective molecules to combat the parasite Plasmodium, causal agent of malaria.

Two analogues of borrelidin were found to cure 100% of infected mice and produce immunological memory in these animals, a property not previously observed in an antimalarial drug.

Growing resistance to current treatment for malaria increases the need for new drug candidates.

<p>Scheme of the predictive model of chemical substances and their association with human diseases. The orange and green circles show adverse and therapeutic effects respectively. The size of the circles is proportional to the number of molecules that hold t</p>
1 Dec 2014

The analysis of drugs, natural products, and chemical substances found in the environment allows the identification of the chemical fragments responsible for a therapeutic or deleterious effect on human health.

This knowledge may be valuable for the design of drugs with fewer secondary effects, for associating diseases, and for identifying new uses for drugs currently on the market.

The predictive model developed by researchers at IRB Barcelona provides information for the treatment of 20% of human diseases.