Genomic Instability and Cancer Laboratory news

<p>A detailed view of the TLK2 structure</p>
28 Jun 2018

A new study in collaboration with the Genomic Instability and Cancer Laboratory at IRB Barcelona and led by the University of Copenhagen,  reveals that TLK2 displays lower levels of activity in intellectual disability and that it is possible to inhibit it in breast cancer, where it is overactive.

The study suggests that the enzyme may be a target for potential therapies. 

<p>Travis Stracker, Renata Basto and Jens Lüders, organizers of the BioMed Conference</p>
11 Jun 2018

A conference organised by IRB Barcelona and the BBVA Foundation brings together leading international researchers devoted to two cell organelles that play key roles in health and disease.

Cancer and certain developmental disorders are characterised by impaired activity of these complex cell structures and defects in cell cycle control.

<p>Travis Stracker, head of the Genomic Instability and Cancer lab at IRB Barcelona</p>
30 May 2018

The video series Meet Our Scientists presents Travis Stracker, head of the Genomic Instability and Cancer lab at IRB Barcelona.

The video “Maintaining stability of the genome” highlights the research underway to unravel how cells prevent genomic instability.

<p>Confocal microscopy shows co-localization of EXD2 (magenta) with the mitochondrial ribosome (yellow). DNA is stained to define the nucleus (cyan).</p>
16 Jan 2018

Published in Nature Cell Biology (NCB), the study shows that the EXD2 protein is critical for the mitochondria, the cell’s powerhouses, to produce energy.

This protein was previously thought to be located in the cell nucleus and to be involved in DNA repair.

The results contribute to our basic understanding of mitochondria and suggest that EXD2 could be important for fertility and represent a potential target for cancer therapy.

<p>Cross sections of wild type or TLK2 deficient embryos stained for the proliferative marker Ki67. Embryos lacking TLK2 (left) appear morphologically normal but developmentally delayed. (S. Segura-Bayona, IRB Barcelona)</p>
18 Jul 2017

Several media have echoed research by IRB Barcelona researcher Travis H. Stracker on the key role of the TLK2 gene for the development of the placenta and for embryo viability in mice.

Published in the journal Cell Death and Differentiation, this finding may be of biomedical relevance. A recent massive genomics study of people with intellectual disabilities performed in the Netherlands points to TLK2 mutations in this population.

Selected media mentions

Link to EFE Futuro

Link to ...

<p>Cross sections of wild type or TLK2 deficient embryos stained for the proliferative marker Ki67. Embryos lacking TLK2 (left) appear morphologically normal but developmentally delayed. (S. Segura-Bayona, IRB Barcelona)</p>
17 Jul 2017

The work is the first to report on the key role of the TLK2 gene in mouse embryo development.

The study solidifies an important role for both TLK1 and TLK2 in genome stability.

A massive genomics study of people with intellectual disabilities performed in the Netherlands points to patient mutations in the TLK2 gene.

<p>This graphic image simulates the metabolic fluxes in cells, with the nutrients marked with a stable isotope that allow to study the fluxes and the transformation dynamics of these nutrients.</p>
23 Feb 2017

A study published this week in the journal Angewandte Chemie presents a new methodology that uses Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to study cell metabolism.

The technology was developed by scientist Òscar Yanes in the Metabolomics Platform, a facility created by the Univeristat Rovira i Virigili (URV) in Tarragona (Spain) and CIBERDEM, with the collaboration of IRB Barcelona group leader Travis Stracker and former PhD student Suvi Aivio. 

The tool makes it possible to monitor metabolic fluxes more quickly than previous methods. In just 10 minutes it can provide dynamic...

14 Apr 2016

The magazine of "Genética Médica News” publishes an article by Berta Terré, PhD student in the Genomic Instability and Cancer Laboratory, about the discovery of Gemc1. This new gene is essential for the generation of multiciliated cells and the association these may have with ciliopathies, a type of rare disease.

15 Mar 2016

ALN Magazine, a journal devoted to animal research facilities, has devoted an exclusive article to the study performed in Travis Stracker's laboratory and published in EMBO Journal.

ALN Magazine news piece

<p>Helena on the day of the discussion of her thesis in 2014</p>
11 Mar 2016

After more than 6 years, Helena González (Salamanca, 1983) has left IRB Barcelona to pursue her dream of communicating science. Thanks to Big Van: Científicos Sobre Ruedas, the company she created together with her colleagues from the first Spanish edition of FameLab, she will be working on two European projects within Science With and For Society, a call under the Horizon2020 framework. The two EU projects she is now involved in aim to bring science into secondary school classrooms using drama-based...