Microtubule organization news

<p>The picture shows cultured neurons prepared from brains of control mice (left) and mice in which the Nek7 gene is knocked out. The dendrites are overall shorter and less branched in NEK7 knockout neurons.</p>
29 Jun 2018

El Correo Gallego, La Sexta, ABC and Diari de Girona, among other media, published an article about IRB Barcelona’s research, led by Jens Lüders’ Lab, which identifies NEK7 as a relevant protein for the correct formation of neurons in the hippocampus, a region of the brain associated with memory.

Link to La Sexta

Link to ABC

 

 

<p>The picture shows a cultured neuron stained with antibodies that label microtubules. NEK7 promotes the stability of the dendritic microtubules, which is important for proper dendrite growth and branching (F Freixo, IRB Barcelona)</p>
27 Jun 2018

Researchers at IRB Barcelona reveal that the protein NEK7 is relevant for the correct formation of neurons in the hippocampus, a region of the brain associated with memory.

Animals without NEK7 may also have defects in other other brain regions.

<p>Travis Stracker, Renata Basto and Jens Lüders, organizers of the BioMed Conference</p>
11 Jun 2018

A conference organised by IRB Barcelona and the BBVA Foundation brings together leading international researchers devoted to two cell organelles that play key roles in health and disease.

Cancer and certain developmental disorders are characterised by impaired activity of these complex cell structures and defects in cell cycle control.

17 Oct 2016

The Meet Our Scientists video series introduces Jens Lüders, who studies microtubules—mini-filaments involved in multiple cell processes. The alteration of these structures is associated with diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s and with developmental defects.

In the video “Curiosity as a fuel”, Lüders recalls that transcendental discoveries arise from basic research and that such science is driven exclusively by curiosity, without specifically pursuing its applicability or transfer.

22 Jul 2016

Extensive media coverage of work by Jens Lüders’ Microtubule Organisation Lab about a novel mechanism by which neurons maintain and regenerate axons. Published in Nature Communications, the study reveals new pathways related to microtubule biology that are relevant for regenerative medicine and research into diseases in which the microtubule network is damaged, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

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<p>Microscopy image of a culture mouse neuron showing the microtubule network in green and red depending on chemical modifications. The axon, in bright green, is the neuronal extension that has the greatest number of modified microtubules (Author: Carlos Sán</p>
21 Jul 2016

The study, led by IRB Barcelona and published in Nature Communications will help research into regenerative medicine and potentially also help understand neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

<p>CEP63 depletion increases stem cell death in the developing mouse brain. The image on the right shows the stem dying cells in purple. The mice are born with microcephaly, a characteristic feature of Seckel Syndrome (Image: Berta Terré, IRB Barcelona)</p>
7 Jul 2015

Researchers at IRB Barcelona study CEP63, a gene that is mutated in Seckel Syndrome, a rare disease that causes microcephaly and growth defects.

The protein CEP63 is crucial for the correct division of brain stem cells. In its absence, mice reproduce Seckel Syndrome.

The scientists rescued the microcephaly during mouse embryonic development by removing a protein that caused the loss of stem cells.

Also, CEP63-depleted male mice are infertile. The relationship between this protein and sperm production is revealed for the first time.

<p>Jens Lüders leads the Microtubule Organization laboratory (Photo: Battista/Minocri, IRB Barcelona)</p>
30 Jun 2014

A breakthrough at IRB Barcelona fills a knowledge gap in understanding how the cell division apparatus, the mitotic spindle, is formed.

The in vivo visualization and monitoring of the starting points of microtubules — filaments responsible for organising the mitotic spindle — provides novel insight into the dynamic architecture of this structure.

The findings will also contribute to understanding how the mitotic spindle is perturbed by drugs that target microtubules and that are used in chemotherapy.

7 Oct 2013

"The Nobel Prize in Medicine this year reflects the importance of basic research,” explains the head of the Microtubule Organisation Lab at IRB Barcelona Jens Lüders to Materia. The North American scientists James Rothman and Randy Schekman and the German Thomas Südhof have been awarded this recognition for solving the mystery of how the cell organises its transport...

25 Mar 2013

Collaboration between researchers at the Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (IBB) of the “Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona”, the Institute for Biocomputation and Physics of Complex Systems in Zaragoza, and IRB Barcelona has led to the publication of the first scientific paper on data collected from the BL13-XALOC beamline of the Alba Synchrotron, located in Cerdanyola de Vallès, a facility that which allows scientists to obtain 3D structures of macromolecular complexes.

The team at IRB Barcelona headed by the research associate Joan Roig...