Results about: beta amyloid

New strategy to obtain a specific type of amyloid-beta aggregate that may underlie neuronal death in Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers at IRB Barcelona describe for the first time how to prepare a specific type of aggregate of the amyloid-beta protein with the ability to perforate the cell membrane.

What causes neuron death and the subsequent cognitive decline in Alzheimer´s disease is still unknown.

The findings of an IRB Barcelona study challenge a scientific principle about amyloid beta, a protein linked to Alzheimer’s disease

Natàlia Carulla’s research group provides information that questions the widely accepted premise regarding the number of molecules and the shape of the first aggregates formed by amyloid beta protein

Amyloid beta protein aggregation, the process by which molecules of this protein adhere to each other is strongly associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease

Carulla’s work ultimately seeks to identify molecules that interfere with the initial stages of aggregation as a strategy to combat the disease.

IRB Barcelona launches a new project to fight Alzheimer’s disease

The project, led by Natàlia Carulla, has been awarded funds from “La Marató de TV3” initiative held in 2013.

The project, which will be undertaken over three years, aims to verify a new therapeutic target to fight Alzheimer’s.

Laying siege to beta-amyloid, the key protein in Alzheimer’s disease

Scientists at IRB Barcelona in collaboration with researchers at the University of Barcelona observe that aggregates of 20 to 100 units of beta-amyloid have a structure that is the most harmful to neurons.

This is the first time that a method allows scientists to monitor aggregation while simultaneously detect a structural pattern responsible for the toxicity of beta-amyloid aggregation.

The researchers state that these studies are a step towards finding a therapeutic target for a disease which, to date, has no treatment.

New angles on Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease has no cure and virtually no palliative treatments are available. Even today its origin is still unknown. All this has driven the international scientific community to back new approaches that allow early diagnosis of the disease and the discovery of a treatment to stop its progression. IRB Barcelona is not oblivious to this tendency. The researchers Patrick Aloy and Natàlia Carulla head projects addressing an alternative slant on the control and progression of the disease and the discovery of new therapeutic agents.