Results about: biocomputation

Designing tiny platforms in living cells to observe proteins in 3D

Ground-breaking research sometimes arises as a result of coincidence, multidisciplinarity and, of course, perseverance. Biochemist Oriol Gallego (Barcelona, 1978) is a Ramón y Cajal Research Associate in Raúl Méndez’s Translational Control of Cell Cycle and Differentiation Lab. Oriol led a promising study that has just been published in Cell. Combining genetic engineering, super-resolution microscopy, and biocomputation, he was able to see a 3D “protein nanomachine” in a living yeast cell. This breakthrough paves the way for inspiring future discoveries, such as the live observation of how viruses use protein complexes to infect cells.

First 3D observation of nanomachines working inside cells

Researchers headed by IRB Barcelona combine genetic engineering, super-resolution microscopy and biocomputation to allow them to see in 3D the protein machinery inside living cells

Published in the journal Cell, the study unveils key functional features of an assembly of proteins that is vital for animals and plants.

With this new strategy in hand, it will be possible to study cellular protein machinery in health and in disease.

Structural biologists endorse the potential of their field to extract quality information from “big data”

International experts in structural biology, such as Nobel laureate Ada E. Yonath, and in massive genomic analysis, such as the bioinformatician Chris Sander—one of the fathers of biocomputation—, are gathering in Barcelona this week with the aim to identify synergies and throw light on the jumble of massive biological data currently available.

The Barcelona Biomed Conference organised by IRB Barcelona and the BBVA Foundation will be held from today 28 to 30 November at the Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

This afternoon, there will be an open debate on “Women in science”, chaired by Ada E. Yonath.

IRB Barcelona intensifies its research on cancer with two new recruits

As of November, Núria López-Bigas, winner of the 2016 Banco Sabadell Foundation Prize for Biomedical Research, will join IRB Barcelona to continue her research on cancer using computational biology.

The Institute has also recruited Croatian scientist Fran Supek, who will launch his laboratory in 2017.

A minimalist theory to predict protein movements

Scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm develop a new method that predicts the way in which proteins move to exert their biological functions.

They have demonstrated that protein movement is governed by the general shape of these molecules, thereby providing new data on how proteins work—a key step for drug development.