Results about: biophysics

A high resolution description of the structure and dynamics of proteins is a very useful tool to study the properties and the function of these important biomacromolecules and, most importantly, to understand how changes in sequence or environment can lead to disease.

Our research focuses on three angles of peptide and protein chemistry : the design, synthesis and structure of bioactive molecules. From a structural perspective, we apply modern NMR techniques to study complex molecular recognition processes.

When a denaturant stabilizes DNA

Combination of two strong denaturants of DNA leads to stabilization of the structure

An unexpected finding that opens new fields to the biotechnological use of DNA

Rare and orphan but not abandoned by science

On Friday 6 March in a conference at the CCCB, researcher Xavier Salvatella will explain the excellent moment being experienced by research into rare diseases.

Salvatella will present the breakthrough in his lab regarding Kennedy’s disease, a rare muscular atrophy that affects 1 in 36,000 men. “In five years’ time we could have a candidate drug tested in cells in vitro.”

This is the first of four conferences in the “Science today for the medicine of the future”, proposed by IRB Barcelona to explain the close link between basic research and medicine of the future, held on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of the centre.

Researchers measure a property of DNA for the first time

The electric polarizability of DNA is a fundamental property that directly influences its biological functions. Despite the importance of this property, however, its measurement has remained elusive so far.

In a study published in PNAS today, researchers at Barcelona’s Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC) led by Laura Fumagalli, senior researcher at IBEC and lecturer at the University of Barcelona, and their collaborators at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB) and at Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), and at Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia (CNB-CSIC) and IMDEA Nanociencia in Madrid, describe how they have found a way to directly measure DNA electric polarizability – represented by its dielectric constant, which indicates how a material reacts to an applied electric field – for the first time ever.