Results about: cell engineering

Designing tiny platforms in living cells to observe proteins in 3D

Ground-breaking research sometimes arises as a result of coincidence, multidisciplinarity and, of course, perseverance. Biochemist Oriol Gallego (Barcelona, 1978) is a Ramón y Cajal Research Associate in Raúl Méndez’s Translational Control of Cell Cycle and Differentiation Lab. Oriol led a promising study that has just been published in Cell. Combining genetic engineering, super-resolution microscopy, and biocomputation, he was able to see a 3D “protein nanomachine” in a living yeast cell. This breakthrough paves the way for inspiring future discoveries, such as the live observation of how viruses use protein complexes to infect cells.

First 3D observation of nanomachines working inside cells

Researchers headed by IRB Barcelona combine genetic engineering, super-resolution microscopy and biocomputation to allow them to see in 3D the protein machinery inside living cells

Published in the journal Cell, the study unveils key functional features of an assembly of proteins that is vital for animals and plants.

With this new strategy in hand, it will be possible to study cellular protein machinery in health and in disease.