Results about: chromatin

<p>Stracker</p>

The recognition of many types of DNA lesions activates the cellular DNA damage response (DDR). The DDR orchestrates the appropriate cellular programs to maintain genome integrity after genotoxic stress.

<p>Azorin</p>

Genomic functions take place in chromatin, not in naked DNA.

Histone 1, the guardian of genome stability

Genomic instability is the main risk factor for tumour development in humans. Therefore understanding its origin and exploring therapeutic targets is paramount.

Histone 1 silences a region of the genome that causes irreparable DNA damage when translated and is lethal for the organism.

A new tool to enter the era of multiscale genomics and dynamic chromatin

Scientists in the Multiscale Complex Genomics (MuG) Consortium are working on new cloud-based computational infrastructure to support and improve the existing genome analysis tools. The beta-version of the Virtual Research Environment (VRE) was presented for the first time in Cambridge in April. MuG is a Horizon 2020 project coordinated by IRB Barcelona Group Leader Modesto Orozco.

Europe injects 3 million euros into three-dimensional genomics

IRB Barcelona is to coordinate a Horizon2020 bioinformatics project that seeks to lay the groundwork for the emerging field of 3D genomics.

3D genomics provides information about the structures adopted by folded DNA inside a cell and about how they change over time and in response to alterations in cell environment. Modesto Orozco, the coordinator of the project says, “The 3D perspective will allow us to better relate changes in the genome with the corresponding diseases, because although 1D information is relevant, it falls short.”

Over three years, the project aims to provide a set of methods and integrated databases that can be used to store and process the data deriving from studies devoted to 3D genomics.

The European consortium comprises six international leading centres in method development and visualisation in 3D genomics.

 

Discovery of an unexpected function of a protein linked to neurodegenerative diseases

A study done on fruit flies and published in Nature Communications reveals that the protein dDsk2, in addition to degrading proteins, also plays a key role in regulating gene expression.

This protein is also present in humans and is known to be mutated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s. But the mechanism by which these mutations contribute to the development of disease remains unclear.

IRB Barcelona is to start a study to examine the relationship between dDsk2 mutations and neurodegenerative diseases.