Results about: tumor

<p>Angel R Nebreda</p>

The Signalling and Cell Cycle Laboratory focuses on studying the basic mechanisms of cell regulation, especially regarding how external signals are interpreted by cells to modulate cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Our research centers on two main subjects:

P38MAM

New combination therapy for breast tumours, with selection marker

Genes activated in metastasis also drive the first stages of tumour growth

In spite of the difference between the cell functions responsible for giving rise to a tumour and for the metastasis of this same tumour, studies at IRB Barcelona using the fly Drosophila melanogaster reveal that some genes can drive both phenomena.

Researchers identify a key molecule in flies that adjusts energy use under starvation conditions

Scientists at IRB Barcelona have observed that, when deprived of food, flies that do not express p53 show poor management of energy store.

The study, published today in Cell Reports, further supports the involvement of this molecule—traditionally associated with tumour suppression—in metabolism.

The researchers provide new insights to study p53 function in metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity.

Researchers at IRB discover a key regulator of colon cancer

The team headed by Angel Rodríguez Nebreda, ICREA researcher at IRB, identifies for the first time in mice that the p38 MAPK protein is required for the survival and proliferation of colon cancer cells.

In the same study the scientists demonstrate that a p38 inhibitor that has been used in clinical trials for inflammatory diseases shrinks the tumours in mice.

The study, published today in Cancer Cell, has received funding from the BBVA Foundation, the European project InflaCare, the Spanish Government, and the European Research Council (ERC).

Researchers at IRB Barcelona discover a general mechanism that accelerates tumor development

• ICREA professor Raúl Méndez publishes a study in Nature describing how the CPBE1 protein “takes the brakes off” the production of proteins associated with the cell switch from being healthy to tumorous.

• The study highlights CPEB proteins as promising targets, thus opening up a new and unexplored therapeutic window.

• The lab has developed a system for screening compounds that impede the action of CPEB proteins in tumors.