Results about: tumour

Scientists shed light on how cells with an incorrect number of chromosomes lead to tumour development

Aneuploid cells—that is to say those with an abnormal number of chromosomes—are found in most human tumours.

A study conducted at IRB Barcelona on the fly Drosophila reveals how surviving aneuploid cells favour tumour development.

A technique dating back to 1935 is recovered for cancer research in flies

Scientists at IRB Barcelona publish the details of an old tissue transplant method for Drosophila melanogaster.

This technique allows the study of tumour growth and tissue regeneration

Researchers identify a key molecule in flies that adjusts energy use under starvation conditions

Scientists at IRB Barcelona have observed that, when deprived of food, flies that do not express p53 show poor management of energy store.

The study, published today in Cell Reports, further supports the involvement of this molecule—traditionally associated with tumour suppression—in metabolism.

The researchers provide new insights to study p53 function in metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity.