PhD News

<p>3D structure of the human γ-tubulin ring complex.</p>
21 Dec 2020

This work paves the way for the in vitro study of the nucleation process that is essential for assembly and organisation of the microtubule cytoskeleton.

The paper is a collaboration between Jens Lüders’ group at IRB Barcelona and Oscar Llorca’s at CNIO.

The results have been published in Science Advances.

24 Nov 2020

IRB Barcelona is offering up to 20 places to carry out 4-year doctoral studies in its 28 laboratories.

Highly motivated graduates in scientific disciplines with laboratory experience and good academic records are sought.

In addition to scientific training, those selected will be trained in Open Science, entrepreneurship and interpersonal skills, within the framework of the European project ENABLECARES.

<p>Cell plasticity: different and reversible identities (Cian J. Lynch, IRB Barcelona)</p>
28 Sep 2020

Researchers at IRB Barcelona’s Cellular Plasticity and Disease Laboratory propose a more efficient way to limit cell plasticity without causing cell damage.

The new method sheds light on processes in which cell plasticity is important, such as cancer and immunology.

The study has been published in the journal Nature Cell Biology and has been supported by ”la Caixa” Foundation.

22 Sep 2020

Researchers from the Structural Bioinformatics and Network Biology Laboratory at IRB Barcelona develop a system to predict tumour response to different treatments.

Called Targeted Cancer Therapy for You (TCT4U), this system has allowed them  to identify a set of complex biomarkers that are available to the medical-scientific community.

The work has been published in the journal Genome Medicine.

<p>Cancer cells with TLK inhibition show replication intermediates (green) at chromosome ends (red) - (IRB Barcelona)</p>
5 Aug 2020

These proteins are a potential therapeutic target for enhancing the effect of some cancer treatments.

Inhibition of TLK proteins triggers the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres pathway, a common process in some of the most aggressive types of cancer, such as glioblastoma.

The study, performed by the Genomic Instability and Cancer Laboratory at IRB Barcelona, has been published in the journal Cell Reports.

<p>The discovered type of diffuse hypermutation is called "mutation fog". (Dave Hoefler, Unsplash)</p>
4 Aug 2020

The mechanism unveiled triggers a mutation fog, causing hundreds of mutations in each tumor, which spread through the genome of lung, head-and-neck and breast cancers.

Researchers from the Genome Data Science Lab have identified the antiviral APOBEC3A enzyme as the major cause of this new type of hypermutation.

Published in Nature Genetics, the study shows how the mutation fog process generates many oncogenic “cancer driver” mutations, thus accelerating tumour development.

2 Jul 2020

Of the 614 cell lines studied, 7% closely corresponded to a different type of cancer than that thought to give rise to the cell line.

The Genome Data Science Laboratory at IRB Barcelona has drawn up a reference list of 366 cell lines in which the genetic pattern corresponds to the type of tumour that they intend to model.

The work shows that studies using the cell lines on this reference list have a greater discovery rate, and has been published in the journal Science Advances.

 

<p>DNA lesions. Credit: Petra Korlevic</p>
25 Jun 2020

DNA damage caused by chemical mutagens is not repaired immediately and can create more genetic diversity in tumours, as lesions pass on unrepaired over several rounds of cell division.

A study by the Liver Cancer Evolution Consortium explores the evolution of tumours after chemical damage, offering interesting insights into how mutational processes work.

The work has been published in the journal Nature.

 

19 May 2020

The Chemical Checker provides processed, harmonized and ready-to-use bioactivity information on more than 1M small molecules

The tool, developed by the Structural Bioinformatics and Network Biology lab at IRB Barcelona, has been published in Nature Biotechnology.

 

<p>Tumour heterogeneity: cancer stem cells (green) and differentiated cells (in red). IRB Barcelona.</p>
12 May 2020

The Colorectal Cancer Lab at IRB Barcelona identifies the capacity to synthesize proteins (or biosynthetic capacity) as a key property for the regenerative potential of colon cancer cells.

Published in Cell Stem Cell, the study proposes a new therapeutic focus for the scientific community and the pharmaceutical industry to explore.