Results about: 3D genomics

Genomics prepares to jump to three dimensions

Specialists advance toward the “Google Earth” of the genome, which will allow them to see the detailed structure of DNA folded within the nucleus, from atomic resolution to the level of the entire molecule

3D genomics promises to reveal the hidden layer of gene regulation and allow researchers to uncover the causes of many diseases

20 world leaders in 3D genomics will meet today until Wednesday in Barcelona at the Barcelona BioMed Conference organized by IRB Barcelona and the BBVA Foundation.

A new tool to enter the era of multiscale genomics and dynamic chromatin

Scientists in the Multiscale Complex Genomics (MuG) Consortium are working on new cloud-based computational infrastructure to support and improve the existing genome analysis tools. The beta-version of the Virtual Research Environment (VRE) was presented for the first time in Cambridge in April. MuG is a Horizon 2020 project coordinated by IRB Barcelona Group Leader Modesto Orozco.

“Find something that truly motivates you, everything else will come naturally”

Postdoc Enrique Marcos (Barcelona 1982) is a chemist, a theoretical chemist to be exact. He has just published his first paper in Science, in which he explains how to computationally design the pocket-like cavities of proteins—essential areas that allow many proteins to perform their functions. And he has just been awarded a second Marie Skłodowska-Curie Action Fellowship.

 

Europe injects 3 million euros into three-dimensional genomics

IRB Barcelona is to coordinate a Horizon2020 bioinformatics project that seeks to lay the groundwork for the emerging field of 3D genomics.

3D genomics provides information about the structures adopted by folded DNA inside a cell and about how they change over time and in response to alterations in cell environment. Modesto Orozco, the coordinator of the project says, “The 3D perspective will allow us to better relate changes in the genome with the corresponding diseases, because although 1D information is relevant, it falls short.”

Over three years, the project aims to provide a set of methods and integrated databases that can be used to store and process the data deriving from studies devoted to 3D genomics.

The European consortium comprises six international leading centres in method development and visualisation in 3D genomics.